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Need help replacing valve in shower

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Topic by MTBrian posted 02-13-2010 12:48 PM 3502 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MTBrian

2 posts in 3763 days

02-13-2010 12:48 PM

I am replacing a tub/shower and the faucets. I have a question on the valve though. The old valve is sweated in copper. The new valve is threaded. What is the best way to connect this valve? Should i just cut off the the old valve and insert compression nuts on all four connections? Or do i need to solder the connections? If so, what type of insert am i looking for to connect the valve to the pipe?



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jamesmrosas

12 posts in 3672 days

05-20-2010 03:08 PM

Hi MTBrian,

Have you replace the tub/shower and the faucet? How did it go?

-- http://stoneideasllc.com/

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UnionLabel

70 posts in 3797 days

05-20-2010 03:49 PM

I do not like compression fittings hidden in walls. I even think it is against code no matter where you live. Sweat your fittings, much better flow in the long run. Remember to remove the guts of the valve so you don’t damage any of the internal components with the heat of the torch.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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SawdustJunky

20 posts in 3713 days

05-20-2010 08:08 PM

I prefer the long lasting , tried an true method, sweating. I would not use compression in a wall that is to be sealed for sure. Have you looked at Shark or Gator connector? I have used them and they are easy to install. The vote is still out on the life span but they are a definate improvement over compression.

-- ... In the end it is more about the memories we make than the pieces we build.

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MTBrian

2 posts in 3763 days

05-22-2010 05:46 PM

i threaded inserts into the valve and then sweated new pipe in.

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jstatham027

22 posts in 433 days

12-11-2019 07:49 PM

Measure the length of pipe that you will need to join your piping system together. Using a tubing cutter, cut your pipe to size https://solderingironguide.com/blog/how-to-solder-copper-pipe/ With copper it is important not to miss a step or there could be disastrous results. Remember these steps and you will be on your way to a perfect solder joint every time.

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sourlemon

2 posts in 219 days

12-31-2019 05:53 AM

It’s good that you do this kind of work yourself, I’m sure you’ll make it if you try.
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heenacruzl

49 posts in 337 days

03-02-2020 09:08 AM

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