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Topic by lilredweldingrod posted 04-06-2010 06:53 AM 4929 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lilredweldingrod

11 posts in 4625 days

04-06-2010 06:53 AM

Hello to everone. I’ve been watching several of the DIY shows on TV. This raised a question for me. My home was built in 1987 in the Mojave Desert in the northeastern corner of LA county. The programs talk about attic ventilation to prevent mosture/mold/mildew problems. I have 3 foot eaves all around and noticed what I thought was paint curling on the underside of the sheeting. On closer investigation, it appears that the veneer on the sheeting is also splitting and curling. I just reroofed two years ago. Along with this problem there are a lot of shiners from the reroofing. (Thanx to some of our finest young Marines)

I looked all around the house for holes drilled in the 2×4’s between the rafters and found none. There are vents on the roof facing east only due to our prevailing winds from the WSW. I see no evidence of mosture problems and was wondering if I can cover the exposed sheeting and rafters under the eaves to protect what is left of the sheeting, and make it easier to paint and keep up with the maintenance without creating a ventilation problem in my attic.

I hope I have explained this well enough to make it understandable.

-- Yesterday I could not spell welder; Today I are one.



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Sarit

7 posts in 4715 days

04-17-2010 12:03 PM

If your roof sheathing is deteriorating from water damage, then you should probably figure out how water is getting on it. That would solve your curling paint problem. It might be a leak farther up and the water is just rolling along the underside of the sheathing. Covering your eaves isn’t going to protect them and yes you will probably be creating a ventilation problem in your attic. The eaves (or soffits) work together with your vents to ventilate. Only in rare circumstances can you have only one of them.

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lilredweldingrod

11 posts in 4625 days

04-18-2010 06:16 AM

Sarit,
I don’t think the damage is water related. My garage door skin did the same, only worse form the afternoon sun here in the desert. There was a small area over the eaves in front that was replaced due to water damage after the winds tore part of the roofing away. We regularly get 60mph+ each year. The new shingles are 80 mph/40 year shingles.
I believe the problem is that the paint under the eaves is the original pain from 1987. I have all the vents on the east side of the roof and in searching all the way around, I find no ventilation holes for the attic. I am thinking that with our dry climate, maybe they are not needed? I was just trying to clean up the underside before I sand, pressure wash, primer and paint. I am really green at this carpentry as I have spent most of my adult life in sheet metal manufacturing.I just don’t want to create a problem in the attic. I just can’t figure why there are no vents around the outside.

Sarit, I thank you for the input on this matter.Rand

-- Yesterday I could not spell welder; Today I are one.

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Sarit

7 posts in 4715 days

04-18-2010 08:48 AM

There’s actually a couple of ways to provide ventilation in your attic so it might be possible that you have one that you aren’t aware of.
Is the eastern vent located near the bottom or top of the attic, or is it so big that it is basically reaching from top to bottom. I’m assuming that the vent is on a vertical wall, am I correct?
You might also have what’s called a ridge vent along the peak of your roof or one of those spinning globe like turbines on your roof.

Do you have anything that looks like this around your house? These may not look like vents but they are.
Soffit

The best way to be sure is to go inside your attic and crawl to the edge to see if you see any light from the outside.

Attic ventilation is not only for moisture removal, but also for keeping your roof cool. A hot attic will shorten the life of the shingles and tar paper on top.

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