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What to do with replaced windows?

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Topic by John Steffen posted 05-05-2010 09:07 PM 2992 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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John Steffen

3 posts in 4087 days

05-05-2010 09:07 PM

I bought a full set of 22 replacement windows for my 1917 American Foursquare house. Over the winter and Spring my dad and I have been putting a few in here and there and figure we’ll get it done this summer sometime.

My problem is, what the heck do I do with the old windows? Not only do I have to deal with the two double-hung window panes, but each window has a full-size storm window and a full-size screen window (the kind you swap out as the seasons change). They’re really starting to take up some serious space, and if I can’t come up with something clever to do with them soon I’m going to just get rid of them. But I don’t even know the best way to do that since some of these guys are almost 4’x7’



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UnionLabel

70 posts in 4122 days

05-06-2010 01:32 PM

Old Storm windows were used to make what is called a cold frame for starting flowers and veggies migration process to the out doors, but 22 plus the interior sashes would be a lot of cold frames. Maybe you could recycle the glass and install acrylic and make yourself a green house?

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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GrowMap

9 posts in 4036 days

05-07-2010 08:21 AM

Where are you? Cold frames are exactly what I would do with them!

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John Steffen

3 posts in 4087 days

05-07-2010 01:33 PM

I’m in Illinois. After looking up cold frames, I think I will build a few for next year for myself and my father and step mom who are both avid gardeners.

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GrowMap

9 posts in 4036 days

05-07-2010 06:51 PM

Great idea. If you have more after that I have friends in Illinois who might be interested or you could make and sell them. There are many more people (wisely) interested in gardening these days.

I once saw a really nifty device that automatically opens cold frames for you. I wish I could find that link now. I don’t remember how expensive it was. If you had a bunch of them you could have one that automatically opened that triggered a bell or something to let you know it was time to manually open them all.

It is not nearly as cold here (Texas outside Dallas) but I have been able to keep my garden alive through two winters without cold frames. I put buckets of water in the isles and cover the garden with old sheets and blankets before the sun goes down on nights there will be a hard freeze. The water evaporates under the cover and keeps it warmer under there.

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John Steffen

3 posts in 4087 days

05-08-2010 03:23 AM

I found some auto openers on amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Cold-Frame-Automatic-Opener-Arm/dp/B0007VLQC8

They look pretty simple, and at $60 I might try one.

Here’s another for around $50 http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-8136-univent-automatic-opener.aspx

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MsDebbieP

628 posts in 4779 days

05-08-2010 02:32 PM

old windows make great greenhouses as well.
post something at GardenTenders.. maybe someone is in your region and would love to have them.

-- ~ Debbie, Ontario Canada

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GrowMap

9 posts in 4036 days

05-08-2010 06:07 PM

Thanks John! I’ve saved those links. Whenever you buy anything from a merchant listed on Amazon you can benefit them more by buying directly from their site instead of through Amazon. They take a very steep commission off the top.

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GrowMap

9 posts in 4036 days

05-09-2010 05:58 PM

I just thought of something else. There are companies that resell old windows, doors, fireplace mantels, fixtures, bathtubs, old stoves and heaters, reclaimed wood and anything else you replace. Whenever you remodel or renovate you may be able to sell what you no longer need to them or at least get them to take it off your hands.

Some millwork companies will also buy reclaimed lumber or re-mill it into whatever you want. Old buildings, bridges, and other structures were built with heart woods that are in high demand because they are stronger, hard (or even impossible) to buy new, and have more beautiful grains.

I commend you for asking what to do with the windows. Many are not aware of the demand and benefits to the environment of recycling windows and anything else useful and especially reclaiming old lumber. It is likely that you can find someone who will pay more for what you can salvage than it costs to have a building torn down.

I hope more people will sell what they remove or find another purpose. The huge beams in old barns, houses and bridges can be turned into so many things. I read more about that in Good Millwork’s blog on how they mill what they call “customer supplied lumber” into whatever that person can use.

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