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Copper flashing install on a deck remodel

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Topic by DouglasFir posted 05-23-2010 07:13 PM 10892 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DouglasFir

4 posts in 3974 days

05-23-2010 07:13 PM

I’m in the process of waterproofing the junction where my deck meets my house. I removed the cedar shingle siding directly above the ledger board and put Grace Vycor Plus over the ledger and up the sheathing. Because I’m going to re-deck with 5/4×6 PT I made a copper flashing/drip edge out of a roll 3 oz. 8” copper flashing. I just finished my right angle bend. I’m now looking at the manufacturer’s website and it states that the copper side should face inward. When I bent my right angle I did that with the copper facing out away from the sheathing. Does anyone know if this is going to be an issue? I don’t want to have to fix this 20 years from now so I’m willing to bend a new piece if needed.

This is the first exterior repair/remodel I’ve done so I’m a newbie at this. Thanks for your expertise!

Will

picture

with grace vycor applied



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UnionLabel

70 posts in 4112 days

05-23-2010 11:24 PM

If it is solid copper it wont be a problem. If it is copper coated then you need a do over. The reason is you don’t want the base metal to react with the wood. Always try and use solid copper. The new PTL uses alkaline copper quat (ACQ) as a preservative, which is less harmful to the environment and to you. The problem with this new pressure treated lumber, however, is that the ACQ product contains much higher levels of copper. Copper is not a safety issue by itself, however it is more corrosive when put in contact with steel and other metals. In time this corrosive action could lead to deck flashing failure if aluminum or galvanized flashing were used with this newly treated lumber.

Consequently, if you are building a pressure treated deck it is best to use a copper based deck flashing to prevent corrosion. It is also important to use copper nails when securing the copper deck flashing to the deck ledger board and home, again to prevent corrosion.

Installing Deck Flashing

There are a number of ways to install deck flashing, however my recommendation is to install the flashing such that it slides up 2-3 inches behind the first row of clapboard siding that sits just above the surface of the finished deck, and wraps over and partially down the outside edge (approximately 1 inch) of the deck ledger board.

Make sure when installing the decking that you do not punch nails or screws into the deck flashing as this will enable water to seep through the nail holes into the deck flashing and behind the deck ledger board.

At deck flashing junctions, overlap the sections of deck flashing by 6-10 inches and apply a bead of silicone caulk.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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DouglasFir

4 posts in 3974 days

05-23-2010 11:36 PM

Thanks for the knowledge. It’s solid copper with a kraft paper/asphalt back. The copper will extend six inches up the sheathing so it’ll have about 4” up behind the first course of primed cedar shingles. The copper isn’t very thick, I don’t think I need 16 oz. like roofers use. Any thoughts?

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UnionLabel

70 posts in 4112 days

05-24-2010 01:11 AM

No you don’t need the 16oz., just what you have is fine.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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DouglasFir

4 posts in 3974 days

05-25-2010 12:52 AM

I’ve shelled out over $300 dollars for two boxes of primed #1 r&r cedar shingles. Now that I have them home the mfr’s instructions say not to paint with latex because it can cause bleeding during the drying process. Anyone have experience with this? I’ve been letting them dry out for weeks on my deck. But if I’m better off laying up unprimed I can do so.

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UnionLabel

70 posts in 4112 days

05-25-2010 03:13 AM

You can paint them, you just have to seal them. Use a good quality unwaxed Shellac to seal them firt and you will be fine. Something like Zinnsers should work just fine.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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DouglasFir

4 posts in 3974 days

05-25-2010 04:38 AM

Great, I already have a gallon of that on hand. Seal, dry and then shingle?

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UnionLabel

70 posts in 4112 days

05-25-2010 02:01 PM

DouglasFir, Yep, pretty much. I know, you can buy preprimed cedar trim from a good local lumber yard. That will save you a ton of time. Stay away from BORG’s on this product, the stuff they get tends to be poor quality, lots of knots primed over that eventually fallout.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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Anju

1 post in 1619 days

11-02-2016 07:15 PM

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listoutdoor

25 posts in 575 days

09-22-2019 01:59 AM

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vegus168

1 post in 565 days

09-23-2019 07:05 AM

Thanks you’for you’re Information sir i hopful it’s make me great soon

vegus168

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