HomeRefurbers

Code question - Heating a half bath

« back to Interior Home Improvement forum

Topic by bringitonhome posted 06-22-2010 03:45 PM 4240 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View bringitonhome's profile

bringitonhome

5 posts in 4027 days

06-22-2010 03:45 PM

Hello-
I’m renovating a 22’x7’ room. I’m walling off 4’ on one end to create a half bath. I have steam heat, and the room currently has a HUGE radiator which keeps the entire space well heated in the winter. My question is – must I now place an additional heating element in the half bath to meet code, or will the air circulation from the original radiator be sufficient?

Thanks



View UnionLabel's profile

UnionLabel

70 posts in 4112 days

06-22-2010 06:46 PM

I would say yes, because you are changing the rooms dynamics. I am assuming one wall will be on the outside. You also have to remember that you need a ceiling fan. Is it first floor or second floor? Find out if you can install in floor electric heat as an alternative in your area. That could solve your problem and be less costly.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

View bringitonhome's profile

bringitonhome

5 posts in 4027 days

06-22-2010 08:12 PM

Thanks UnionLabel.
I shouldn’t need a fan becasue there is a window in the bath. I’m considering installing an electric baseboard heater, but the only logical place for it is under that window – since the other three walls will each have the toilet, vanity, and directly across, the doorway. But…you can’t place an electrical outlet over an electric baseboard heater, so i will end up violating the code that says you need an electrical outlet within 6 feet of the end of a wall.

grrrr….

View UnionLabel's profile

UnionLabel

70 posts in 4112 days

06-23-2010 03:18 PM

The NEC says you need an outlet within 3 feet of every basin and it must be GFCI protected. I don’t think the end wall rule is applicable in the bathroom.

Electrical codes for bathrooms are different than every other part of the house, and for good reason: No other area of a home has more potential for water and electricity to meet. Besides potential shock hazards, fire safety is an issue that is addressed in bathroom electrical code a well as other important factors.
Bathroom Outlets

GFCI outlet are mandatory in bathrooms.
All outlets in a bathroom must be GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupter) outlets. GFCI outlets have an electrical disconnect that trips when exposed to water. This prevents major electrical shock and possible fire.

The GFCI outlets are required to be 20 amp outlets wired to a 20 amp circuit breaker. This is for appliances such as blow driers and curling irons.

There is no height requirement for the bath outlet, but the 36 inches is an absolute. That being said, I installed all my bath outlets at 45 inches off the floor right next to the sink.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

View bringitonhome's profile

bringitonhome

5 posts in 4027 days

06-23-2010 06:24 PM

Thanks again.
I’ve put GFCI next to the sink, and I was going to try to move the GFCI receptacle on the wall over so it’s not above the heater, but now it seems i may not need it at all. I’ll do some research to make sure. Should I decide to keep it on the wall, is it good/bad/legal to protect the baseboard heater on the load of the adjacent GFCI?

View UnionLabel's profile

UnionLabel

70 posts in 4112 days

06-25-2010 03:14 PM

The bathroom heater should be on a separate breaker. Spend the extra money and get a GFCI circuit breaker. There is no substitution for safety. As far as the outlet above the heater, I would remove it and just put a blank cover plate over it. It is now a visible junction point, which makes everybody now, know you know the code.
At least those who count(inspectors and other electricians).

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

View Catspaw's profile

Catspaw

35 posts in 4738 days

06-27-2010 12:07 AM

Best advice is to talk to the inspector. Codes are different everywhere. Describe the situation and he/she will tell you what they expect.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

View christyh's profile

christyh

5 posts in 3933 days

07-03-2010 03:54 PM

We follow the International Codes in Oklahoma, and here you would be required to have a source of heat for each room, . . . . have you considered a combo bath fan/heater/light? It meets code requirements here. Just an idea. Christy Hicks

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: All views and comments posted by members are not necessarily those of HomeRefurbers.com or of those working on the site.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

LumberJocks.com :: woodworking showcase