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How to support 55" countertop span

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Topic by hallamjeff posted 03-11-2011 09:19 PM 24944 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hallamjeff

4 posts in 2931 days

03-11-2011 09:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: laundry room counter top cabinet laundry span

I am adding a counter-top over our washer and dryer. The counter will be support along the back and side walls, and at the cabinet, but I’m not sure of the best way to support it at the front. I don’t want to raise the counter height any more than I have to as it would be uncomfortable for my wife to work at. The only idea I have so far is to use some small angle iron or square tube a few inches back from the front edge.

Do you folks have other ideas? Is it even necessary to add extra support (between the wall and cabinet is 55”).

Thanks

Jeff

laundry room

-- - Jeff



View allmyfingers's profile

allmyfingers

31 posts in 2944 days

03-12-2011 05:19 AM

well you could shim it with a stiff rubber shim to the top of the machines, or if you are worried about vibration, a vertical piece of material between the machines would do the job nicely.

-- caring costs nothing

View popztoolz's profile

popztoolz

16 posts in 2952 days

03-12-2011 05:45 AM

Jeff: How much room do you have between the washer and dryer? One way is to use MDF and make a leg from front to back between the two.
William G. Yasovsky, Michael Yasovsky Construction, Bellefonte, PA

-- William G. Yasovsky, Michael Yasovsky Construction, Bellefonte, PA

View dfletcher's profile

dfletcher

128 posts in 3358 days

03-12-2011 02:10 PM

Countertops can be pretty sturdy. They are built to be rigid, so, there may not need to be any support between the spans since you are supporting it on the sides and the back.

However, i would set it up and “mock” the span and such to see if you will have to much.

If so, the best way would be to put something between the washer/dryer. You should have enough room.

View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

100 posts in 3407 days

03-12-2011 06:27 PM

Just fill the space with old socks. They all end up there anyway. (But only singles, no pairs allowed).

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

View hallamjeff's profile

hallamjeff

4 posts in 2931 days

03-13-2011 01:51 AM

I can make some space between the two for a MDF or plywood support as a few of you have suggested… BUT, the floor is lino over the cement floor so can I still fasten that down or do I just fasten it at the top, to the underside of the counter?

-- - Jeff

View dfletcher's profile

dfletcher

128 posts in 3358 days

03-13-2011 05:53 AM

I would just fasten it at the top, possibly at the backside, against the wall as well, to stop it from moving, but, just the top would suffice.

View CanadaJeff's profile

CanadaJeff

2 posts in 3473 days

03-29-2011 09:19 PM

I am doing the exact same project however with an 87 inch counter.
My plan is to support the counter along the back, sides via the sink base cabinet and a MDF between the washer and dryer. I was thinking of simply using brackets to secure the MDF to the underside of the counter. I don’t beleive I would need to secure to the floor, because the weight of the counter should stabilize it.

I do have a question for you. Have you made the cabinet yet. I need to custom make one because of the height of the washer and dryer (standard size cabinets are too short), but haven’t found a decent plan or ideas yet on going about it.

View hallamjeff's profile

hallamjeff

4 posts in 2931 days

03-29-2011 11:30 PM

Hi Jeff,

I have built the cabinet (minus the doors). I didn’t follow a plan, they are really simple when you break it down as just a plywood box. In addition to the custom height, I also had to make the toe-kick high enough to avoid a baseboard heater. I chose to use face frames to match an existing cabinet in the room. I had a book on kitchen cabinets that I referred to for general construction techniques “Building Traditional Kitchen Cabinets” by Jim Tolpin.

The carcass was put together with biscuits. The face frame was joined with pocket screws, and attached to the carcass with pocket screws. They make the job go a lot faster.

I didn’t bother making the cabinet the full depth of the washer and dryer due to special circumstances (i.e. plumbing in the way). It ended up being about 2’ deep.

If you use SketchUp I’ve shared my model with you: Cabinet Model

Hope that helps,

-- - Jeff

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CanadaJeff

2 posts in 3473 days

03-30-2011 06:56 PM

Thanks for sharing! Never made cabinets before so your sketchup is very inspiring.
Cheers
Jeff

View verdesardog's profile

verdesardog

2 posts in 2908 days

04-03-2011 08:38 PM

Just put a cleat on the wall at the rear of the counter, could be just 3/4×2” ply even.

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