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Topic by jroot posted 08-13-2008 11:48 PM 4541 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jroot

35 posts in 4573 days

08-13-2008 11:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bedroom living room dining room basement floors lumber remodeling flooring

We have a fairly new home (8 years) in southern Ontario. When we built it, we put in upgraded carpet, and upgraded underlay in several areas of the house. We are finding that the carpet is buckling in the living room, family room, and really badly in the bedroom. As a result, we are contemplating removing the rugs, and installing hardwood.

What kind of hardwood should one consider? I am considering maple or a really light coloured oak, but not bleached.

Real wood? What thickness?

Laminate? Is there any effect on the resale value of a home with laminate?

Would I have to lay a subfloor with the hardwood? The carpet is currently on plywood, except in the basement family room where it is on concrete.

-- jroot



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tenontim

151 posts in 4680 days

08-14-2008 12:41 AM

J,
You might want to look at some of the do it your self web sites and get the low down on the flooring available.
I’ve used the laminate on a house that I was selling. It went down quick and easy, had a 25 year warranty, and looked ok, but since it wasn’t real wood, I couldn’t bring myself to use it in my new house.
I’m going with the engineered hardwood flooring, which is basically hardwood plywood, with a top layer of whatever wood flavor you’re after. We chose oak. The reason I went with engineered versus solid hardwood, was I could glue it directly to the cement slab, and not have to worry about moisture issues, or wood movement or buckling, etc. My house has a slab that is well above grade (18”) which is one of the stipulations of gluing it to the slab floor.
With solid hardwood, the flooring should be nailed to sleepers, if over concrete. In your case, you could get away with nailing to the plywood floor, if your floor is in good condition and doesn’t have any “soft” spots in it. If the carpet buckling in being caused by subfloor problems, you would want to get those fixed first.

-- Tim

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PaBull

694 posts in 4628 days

08-14-2008 04:17 AM

Laminate is easy to do yourself and it comes with a hard finish. The floor floats. I think this is the cheapest of all. Engineered is more stable than solid, but you almost need a professional to lay it. This too comes prefinished. The finish is harder than what you put on if you do it in place. Solid is really nice, I used it at my house. I used red oak common select at my house. I used a professional installer, but finished it myself with tung and polyurethane.
!2nd coat tungoil in the living room!

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Catspaw

35 posts in 4664 days

08-15-2008 12:47 AM

Hardwood will increase the value because it can be refinished a number of times over many years. Engineered is engineered. You get what you pay for. Engineered is for diy-ers. I look at store-bought engineered as the same as linoleum ( did I just date myself.)

Nail hardwood directly to floor with plywood. I would glue using Bostik on the concrete.

Normal store bought flooring is 3/4”.

You could go to a mill and have anything you want turned into flooring. 1/4 sawn white oak is pretty spiffy. We installed some in a straw bale that they snaggeg from an old school and had the beams resawn.

Personally I like bamboo. Harder than oak, almost as hard as hickory. It can look like a bowling alley though. But, I still like it. You’ll need a better finish for it. It doesn’t take just any finish.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

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jroot

35 posts in 4573 days

08-15-2008 03:44 AM

Catspaw,

Talk to me about bamboo. What is it about bamboo that you like?

I saw some bamboo, that was almost an off-white in colour, without having the bleached look. That would really fit in nicely. How expensive is it? Is it hard to install?

Would I have to put in a subfloor in the basement area to put bamboo on top of the concrete?

-- jroot

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PaBull

694 posts in 4628 days

08-15-2008 03:59 PM

Sorry, forgot to mention bamboo.
We did look at this for our house, but it did not fit our farmhouse style.

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Catspaw

35 posts in 4664 days

08-16-2008 02:00 AM

It’s about the same cost as other hardwood flooring [now.] LumberLiquidators always advertises it but you have to know the quality. I’m sure they’re not selling the quality stuff.

There are four combos. Flat, vertical “grain”, natural, and honey color.

I’ll post a pic very soon of bare flat.

We installed it over concrete on a second floor with glue. I don’t know what a basement floor would do as far as moisture or anything. I got mine from Timbergrass….(left overs from this job.)

I do know that Bostik is insidiously strong, flexible, etc.

I just like bamboo….you can eat it, make tools, chairs, tables, musical instruments, scaffolding, tiki torches, screens, blinds, etc. ....oh yea….and flooring. Installs same as normal solid flooring.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

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Catspaw

35 posts in 4664 days

08-16-2008 02:24 AM

So here’s some raw bamboo flooring…

and again

the other stuff is vertical or on edge. That’s a bit busy for me. Wish I had pics of the floor we did in that renovation. Honey is darker much like a burnt honey color. It seems these are the two main colors it comes in, raw or honey. The two pics are of the same board, different lighting, both unfinished.

I like seeing the joints (as in finger joints) in the wood. You don’t see that in the vertical.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

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jroot

35 posts in 4573 days

08-16-2008 03:53 AM

I’d like to use Bamboo, renewable resource et al, but I tend to agree with you about the joints / ends. What you’ve shown in your last picture is what I’ve seen locally here.

Maybe I am just used to the harder joints, but I am not fussy on this look. It reminds me of the wild bamboo we had growing in our garden in our old place. Damn stuff, we would cut down twice a year, and it would be over our head in no time at all, covered with bees when it was in flower, and I’m allergic to bee stings.

-- jroot

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tenontim

151 posts in 4680 days

08-16-2008 04:21 PM

J, should have got yourself a panda bear to take care of the bamboo :]

-- Tim

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Catspaw

35 posts in 4664 days

08-16-2008 07:16 PM

Something just struck me about what you said or maybe how you siad it or maybe what I said.

This stuff is standard T&G. I shouldn’t have refered to the “joints” as finger joints (as in how engineered 2×4’s are sometimes finger jointed into long lengths.) I almost sounded like I was saying the boards had finger joints on the edges and that’s how they would be placed on the floor edge to edge.

These particular boards are about 6’ long and about 4-5” wide. The “joints” I was refering to are the Knuckle joints in the actual bamboo plant (which you don’t really see with the Edge or vertical grain stuff.)

These boards are engineered like plywood but all bamboo (I think about three layers and 3/4” thick.) The bamboo strips are about an inch or so wide each, so each board looks like four or five flat bamboo strips edge glued together with the knuckles randomly staggered.

Was that a clarification?

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

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PaBull

694 posts in 4628 days

08-16-2008 07:50 PM

TenonTim, are you sniffing Tung Oil again?

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jroot

35 posts in 4573 days

08-16-2008 10:29 PM

Yes, Catspaw, that is indeed clarification. Good explanation. I did realize that they were tongue and groove boards.

It is the width of the boards, and those apparent endings that bother me about the bamboo. See circles below:

Can one still find the narrow hardwood boards like “the olden days” when I was growing up? .. the ones about 1.5 – 2 inch wide boards? Is so, are they a pain to install?

-- jroot

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Catspaw

35 posts in 4664 days

08-17-2008 01:01 PM

Go to LumberLiquidators. They have better pics that you can enlarge. They also have the colors and what not.

“Carbonized”, that’s what I couldn’t remember, not honey color.

Not seeing narrow boards anywhere.

No more of a pain than any other hardwood flooring.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

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jroot

35 posts in 4573 days

08-18-2008 04:19 PM

Is LumberLiquidators a totally American distributor or are there stores in Canada? It was not clear when I checked them out. I thought I saw one for Canada, but it took me to a dead end. ... just curious.

-- jroot

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Catspaw

35 posts in 4664 days

08-19-2008 12:49 AM

I think all their stores are in the lower 48. But, I’m assuming the the natural thing to do if you’re going to deal on the internet, you’d be set-up to ship to other countries. That’s assuming they have more than one brain cell. [that’s my snide remark for LL.]

I’m betting that you could look up a flooring company locally and I bet they’d have bamboo. It’s getting too common/popular not to carry it.

I’d have to say that specialty flooring companies are not always super high priced compared to the big box stores.

[Sidebar]
I’m going to floor my second floor bathroom with the excess bamboo I snaked from a job and use the excess as panels in the cabinetry. I also snaked some free super expensive antique Robin’s egg blue Crane plumbing fixtures to be used there also( I actually hate robin’s egg blue, but it will work.) I might actually build it one of these days.

Yea, o.k. checked their site. They probably don’t have any canadien stores, but, they do ship anywhere. Doesn’t help much if you wants to go see.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

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tenontim

151 posts in 4680 days

08-28-2008 03:08 AM

Do you have Home Depot? I was in our local one this weekend and they had bamboo flooring for stupid cheap.
I don’t know if it was just the local store trying to unload what they had or their regular price.

-- Tim

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jroot

35 posts in 4573 days

08-28-2008 01:46 PM

Yes, we do have Home Depot in Guelph. I’ll check it out today. Thanks.

-- jroot

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mjorgenson

9 posts in 3783 days

12-02-2010 05:07 PM

I tend to recommend engineered hardwood flooring. Laminate, while a great flooring material for many applications, can (as you mentioned) be viewed as a deterrent to some when they are looking at purchasing your home. There is some real value in being able to list the home with “hardwood flooring” which you can if you use an engineered hardwood.

Hardwood Flooring Atlanta

-- Michael, http://myrtlebeach.floorcoveringsinternational.com

View DebbieGartner's profile

DebbieGartner

2 posts in 3756 days

12-25-2010 02:57 AM

My first choice would be to add a solid hardwood since you have a plywood subfloor (except basement). Solid hardwood can be refinished many times and they are a good value. In the basement, if you want hardwood, I would do an engineered one and glue down (assuming floor is flat and level); alternatively, you could do laminate if the hardwood is too expensive.

In terms of type, I would look at what you like vs. budget. Oak is the standard and you can’t go wrong w/ it. Maple is harder & more expensive wood. If you do maple, be sure to get a clear grade (unless you want a more rustic look). I also love bamboo – love the look, the price and that it is a green product.

-- Westchester hardwood flooring

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