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Bypass door loaded header calculator

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Topic by NY_Rocking_Chairs posted 05-11-2013 12:27 PM 3128 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NY_Rocking_Chairs

4 posts in 4752 days

05-11-2013 12:27 PM

I am finishing off part of the basement and am putting bypass doors to enclose the furnace/hot-water-heater/storage area. I am looking at a 14’ span with about 300lbs of load on the header due to the custom bypass doors.

I am struggling to find a reference or calculator to determine what size lumber to use for the header based on the span/load.

Any help would be most appreciated.

No, I am not locked into a 14’ span and can put a central support in place to cut the span in half, but would prefer to keep the entire 14’ open.



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Dan Lyke

331 posts in 5043 days

06-10-2013 04:00 PM

I assume you’ve seen the American Wood Council online calculators? I guess I’m not sure what all you’re actually asking about: The doors are 300 lbs, but what’s sitting on this header above that? Do you have ceiling joists which land on the wall above this header?

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/

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NY_Rocking_Chairs

4 posts in 4752 days

06-10-2013 05:12 PM

The header isn’t supporting a load above. It is supported on either end by vertical studs and holding up the closet doors. It is sitting below the ceiling joists by a few inches due to going under duct-work, etc.

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Dan Lyke

331 posts in 5043 days

06-10-2013 06:35 PM

So going to the AWC Span Options Calculator, we’re talking, presumably, about a sliding door, so you’re really talking about 300 lbs supported over the entire span. It can be a little more concentrated than that (ie: you slide two doors to the center), so let’s call it 600 lbs over the span. If we tell the calculator that we have joist spacing at every 2’, that says we’d have to be okay for about about 85 lbs per “joist” (which doesn’t really exist, but we’re trying to fool the calculator into telling us what we want).

Tossing doug fir into the span calculator just laughs at me with a 14’ span and 80 lbs live load (ie: stuff is changing), 10 lbs dead load, but tells me that with 70 lbs live load and 10 lbs of dead load per 24” segment, we’ll get l/360 deflection. “l/360” is the standard for floors, and I believe says you’ll get 1/360*length deflection over the length of that span. 14’ is 168”, so that says you’ll get just under .5” deflection.

That seems excessive to me, but… what if we could halve the weight? We can, easily, by sistering another 2×12 on there, and then we can get l/720 deflection, or 1/4”. Better…

But at this point I’d take those numbers to a yard that sells gluelam or ijoist products and tell them that you want to do better than that, see what they can come up with.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/

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Sana

2 posts in 1846 days

01-04-2017 12:18 PM

The interior work for any house is very difficult and there would be many hurdles during the work. I would suggest you to go through the articles of Content Writing Vizag , where you will get the solution for your problem. I hope you will get pretty satisfied with the answers.

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