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Carrier Infinity Series Not for 2 Story Houses?

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Topic by Dr_Unix posted 10-09-2014 01:28 AM 10394 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dr_Unix

5 posts in 3716 days

10-09-2014 01:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: carrier variable speed blower furnace hvac question

I just had an HVAC guy out to give me an estimate on a new Carrier Infinity series furnace. He told me that the variable speed blower models will not work in a 2 story house (with a basement). He said that the second floor rooms will always be colder because not as much air is force up there when the blower is at low speed.

Is that true?



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dbray45

157 posts in 1919 days

10-09-2014 11:30 AM

Yes and no.

Many times, depending upon the size of the house, it is desired to create a two zone environment – upstairs is one zone, downstairs, the other. This costs more to implement but can save you a lot over the long haul. The other aspect is how the ducts are balanced, some are opened more than others.

As an example, my thermostat is in my living room. The ducts there are almost closed because they are closer to the main truck and have more pressure. By closing these 90%, I get much more pressure upstairs (where I need more cooling) and the system stays on longer to cool the upstairs before cycling.

Much of it depends upon how the ducts were installed, if they were sized correctly, amount of leaks, how the runs off the mains were put in, etc…

I would get more than one opinion and quote.

The 2 zoned approach cools the upstairs separately. This can be done with dampers – requiring a variable speed fan, or it can be done with two different systems.

-- Love woodworking and fixing most anything

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bold1

26 posts in 2009 days

10-11-2014 12:59 PM

If you have any airflow between the 2nd floor and the first(open stairs, etc.) you will find that the 2nd floor tends to get hotter because the heat rises and the cooler air descends on its own. Old gravity systems used this. Cool air is another matter. Because it’s heavier it’s hard to force it up. Some homes require extra duct fans to force the cooler air higher. I agree with dbray45, get someone else in to give you a quote. Your home should be checked for airflow to help determine return flow. Some homes require more than others. If the air that is already in the room doesn’t have anywhere to go(return to basement, furnace) you will not have good heating or cooling of that area.

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Dr_Unix

5 posts in 3716 days

10-12-2014 01:35 AM

Thanks, all. I got a couple of other estimates and they weren’t very concerned with the variable speed fan not being able to heat the second floor. One explained to me how (and where) I can adjust the baffles to control the air flow going to each floor.

By the way, the two floors are joined with a staircase in an area with a cathedral ceiling. So there’s plenty of airflow.

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dbray45

157 posts in 1919 days

10-13-2014 12:42 PM

Bold1 touches a point that I often forget until I was onsite, the returns of many systems places the filter near the air handler. One of the first things I did when I did went on a trouble call was clean the return. One place was so bad that the return was almost totally obstructed – got 5 lbs of dust and lint out of it. It had never been cleaned.

You would be amazed at how that helps.

BTW – Dr. Unix—I like the name – from someone that has been a senior admin supporting SUN, DEC, AIX, SCO, and Interactive for a long time.

-- Love woodworking and fixing most anything

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Gunslinger

5 posts in 1729 days

11-02-2014 08:06 PM

Question along those same lines. Anyone had any direct thoughts concerning Geothermal heating and cooling?

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Gunslinger

5 posts in 1729 days

11-02-2014 08:07 PM

Question along those same lines. Anyone had any direct thoughts concerning Geothermal heating and cooling?

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dbray45

157 posts in 1919 days

11-10-2014 07:13 PM

I know someone that has one. I have been on the design aspect many years ago. They can be good but that depends upon a whole bunch of variables. Mostly, it is the makeup of the ground where you live.

-- Love woodworking and fixing most anything

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curtisbennett

1 post in 1492 days

06-18-2015 09:09 AM

Geothermal heating and cooling is a good option nowadays and is the most cost-effective way to reduce environmental impact of conditioning spaces. Any reputed and knowledgeable HVAC company will tell you to go for geothermal heating and cooling systems if you can invest a bit. The price of a geothermal system varies as per the type of the loop system, whether it is vertical or horizontal. A regular sized house of around 2500 sq. feet will need upto $25,000 to install.

-- http://allweekplumbing.com/plumber-paramus-nj.html

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Sana

2 posts in 926 days

01-23-2017 07:42 AM

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jim1232

2 posts in 283 days

10-14-2018 10:49 AM

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